When can I seed?

Grassland West products may be planted almost year round as long as there is adequate moisture (rain or irrigation) to keep the surface relatively moist for 45 – 60 days.   Spring is the traditional seeding time.  Dormant seeding (late fall or early winter) can also be successful.  Dormant seeding gives the plants a quick start when soil temperatures rise.

Should I fertilize?

Begin with a fertile seedbed.  Check with your local Grassland West dealer, County Extension Agent, or an agronomist for a soil test and recommendations for the local area.   We DO NOT recommend mixing seed and fertilizer together at planting.

How can I plant when I have all of these weeds?

Kill the existing vegetation with a non-residual herbicide.  Allow time for the herbicide to work then use tillage as a plow, roto-tiller or disk.  Remember the more farming you do, the better success you will have.

How do I get the seeds planted?

Level and smooth the soil using an implement such as a harrow or rake.  Level and break the clods down producing a firm seedbed.  The soil needs to be firm enough that you barely leave a footprint (3/16″).  If you do not have a means of tilling the ground, some options are to burn the area or harrow it well or use a combination of both.  Remember any vegetation left will compete with your new grass.  Irrigate if possible and let the ground stand for 2-3 weeks.  This will allow any weeds to germinate giving another opportunity to remove them.

How do I seed and how much do I use?

The best seeding method is a pasture drill or grain drill with a grass seed attachment.  Other options include broadcasting or using an air machine.  The most important thing to remember is not to seed too deep.  The most common reason for failure is placing the seed too deep – 1/4″ is deep enough.  If you are using a drill and seeding too deep, try pulling the tubes out of openers and let the seed dribble on the ground.  The openers usually move enough dirt to cover the seed.  If it is available, rolling or packing is recommended.  If you broadcast seed, it is recommended to either lightly harrow or pull something light over the field – remember not too deep!  The standard seeding rate for pasture is 15-20 lbs. per acre, if drill seeding.   Broadcast seeding rate increases 20-25 lbs. per acre, the higher seeding rate allows for predators of the seed, like birds or mice.  We do not recommend planting a cover companion crop, these will only compete for moisture and sunlight.  Keep the soil moist for at least 45 days to establish the seedlings.

SEEDING DATE:

You may plant as long as there is adequate moisture (rain or irrigation) to keep the surface relatively moist for 45 days to 60 days.

KILL EXISTING WEEDS:

Kill the existing vegetation with a non-residual herbicide.  Allow time for the herbicide to work then use tillage such as a plow, roto-tiller or disk.  Remember the more farming you do, the better success you will have.

PREPARE THE SOIL:

Till the soil with a plow, roto-tiller or disk.  Level and smooth the soil using an implement such as a harrow or rake that will produce a firm seedbed.  The soil should be firm enough so you can barely see your footsteps when walking across the pasture.

Note:  If you do not have the means of tilling the ground, burning the existing vegetation or using a harrow will often work.  The important thing to do is remove competition for you new grass and provide seed to soil contact.

SEEDING THE APPLICATOR:

The best seeding method is to use a pasture drill, grain drill, or air seeder with grass attachments.  However, broadcast seeding will work, but you will have to seed more pounds per acre.

TYPICAL SEEDING RATE FOR PASTURE MIXES:

DRILL SEEDED:  16 lb. to 18 lb. per acre
BROADCASTED:  25 lb. to 30 lb. per acre

GRAZING:

It is best to wait a year before returning livestock to the newly seeded pasture.   If you can not wait a full year, grazing can be tolerated 60 days after establishment by only grazing a few hours a day.